Sunday, May 01, 2005

Maintaining Perspective - Jamie

With the three pronged mission of Generation MIX being to raise awareness of the mixed race baby-boom, shed light on the growing body of resources for the mixed community and to jump start a national dialogue on mixed race issues, what we’ve been encountering so far has been a variety of intimate discussion oriented gatherings and an interesting series of meetings with various media outlets, including the New York Times, National Public Radio and local television, print and broadcast news groups. I’ve found that the most potential this tour has is as a media-attractive way of introducing this current wave of a multiracial identified population to greater popular society.



While an original goal of the tour may have been to attract a great number of newcomers to our events so that they could directly engage the resources we have to offer, the reality of a project of this kind is that drawing such numbers is far more difficult than one might assume or wish for. The applicable value of this tour, I hope, lies in its proven ability to attract the attention of the media, making our cause seem “news-worthy” in the eyes of the pop-culture media, the main channels through which most of America is exposed to its varied regions. While no news article highlighting the group, the tour or our burgeoning community has been entirely accurate or as true to sentiment as we all would have liked, the sheer fact that this project has garnered such attention has meant that our community and many of the considerations that come along with a mixed identity are just now entering the frames of consciousness of a great many previously unexposed individuals, mixed and mono-racial alike.

The heightened visibility of our community and our place within the general US racialized social system that Generation MIX is giving rise to has only been possible because of the great amounts of recent work other groups have toiled at long and hard. There would be no opportunity for Gen MIX to tour without the established dialogue and levels of awareness community based groups like Swirl and other student organizations have brought about. And on the same token, a project like Generation MIX can only do so much in terms of offering content and discussion. Much of the work we’re doing now would be empty without the community support of groups continuing these discussions on the ground level and amongst the people.



It has been an eye opening and revelatory experience being a part of this tour. I have new perspective on how our movement can be a powerful step in the continued struggle to dismantle racism. I also have new perspective on how much of a bubble my home, the Bay Area, is. But if we in the Bay and those in other similar progressive-yet-isolated areas can recognize our whole-hearted belief in the work we are doing and how we are so motivated to continue it, and also recognize that we may at times be very much disconnected from the rest of the US’s communities, be they differences due to geography or ideology, I think that we will feel impassioned to better our abilities of communication and understanding so that this movement of awareness, consciousness and regard will spread. We have incredible momentum supporting our efforts and I am excited to explore all that we can do with it…

4 Comments:

Anonymous T-Love said...

Amen, brotha.

May 02, 2005 6:54 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

wow you guys, only 1 more week left! Thank you for your commitment and heart in this tour- I think you've accomplished a lot...
::marinda::

May 02, 2005 7:46 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have lived on both coasts (including the Bay Area) and I do not buy into the idea that somehow racism is less in the west. I found it to be just as prevalent, just passive-aggressive and more subtle. Personally, I prefer it to be in my face so I know where people stand. I think **that's** more "progressive" than hiding it!!! ~j.m.

May 04, 2005 8:31 AM

 
Anonymous pheromone cologne said...

can i get more info?

January 13, 2006 10:53 PM

 

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